Book Drunkard

“I am simply a 'book drunkard.' Books have the same irresistible temptation for me that liquor has for its devotee. I cannot withstand them.” L.M. Montgomery

My Love, My Enemy by Jan Cox Speas, review

4 Comments


Jan Cox Speas published three books, My Love, My Enemy being the third in 1961.

Set during the War of 1812, My Love, My Enemy tells the story of bold and sassy American, Page Bradley who, after stealing away with her family’s sloop, meets and handsome stranger – who turns out to be an Englishman, Lord Hazard.

Jan Cox Speas takes them, and her reader, on a wonderful journey full of treachery and danger – France, Spain and beyond – all while mixing in real life historical figures the pair come across.  While the book is short – a mere 272 pages – it is long on lovely reading goodness.  I do have to say though, that I dislike the cover quite a lot.  I didn’t give the book the credit it deserved until I actually cracked it open.  It looks like a bodice ripper but is anything but.

Many thanks to Sourcebooks for sending me this book for review and kudos to them for bringing another hard to find book back to life for readers to enjoy.

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4 thoughts on “My Love, My Enemy by Jan Cox Speas, review

  1. This is the second review today I have seen where the comment has been made about how inappropriate the cover is for this book.

  2. Frankly, I will never understand this sort of cover on historical fiction. I can understand on fluffy ‘historical romance’ (and there is a HUGE difference between the two) – which is what the cover made me think this book was.

  3. Author’s daughter here–the cover is indeed not appropriate to the lovely content. For those who want a good PG historical romance read, you can go to http://www.JanCoxSpeas.com to read the first chapter for free. And you’ll see that the prose will draw you into the delights of the book far more than any cover! So lovely to know there are appreciative readers out there.

  4. Thank you for stopping by Cindy. It seems the cover is a real point of contention with this book. I wonder if perhaps they might think about changing it.

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